Applications that I use

Having mentioned Sketch in my previous post, I thought that I would expand on the applications that I use in my workflows. And to start with, I need to expand on what those workflows actually are.

Which is tricky—because I do quite a number of varied jobs.

First, I do a considerable amount of management, both in my team and in the wider business. This is why my job title is the, slightly unwieldy, Creative and User Experience Manager (usually shortened to CrUX Manager).

Essentially, I lead the team that designs and builds our customers’ websites and intranets on our company’s content management platform (CMS). However, I also design the user interface (UI) and user experience (UX) for the CMS—plus I also design a lot of the new functionality too.

Occasionally, I give talks at events—both internal and external—about the web, CSS, Accessibility, and other related issues.

Because I know a lot about the web, our product and our customers, I have also spent a lot of time in customer pitches, Information Architecture (IA) workshops, and in discovery meetings for new software. In other words, I am heavily involved in a customer’s entire journeys with our company—and, in many cases, for determining the steps along that journey.

And, since I run the CrUX team, I am also responsible for recruitment to that team and, with the operations team, for managing resources on a day-to-day basis. And, of course, when we have a new starter, I am responsible for sorting out software and hardware—which means that I know how much we invest in our applications!

Which brings us back to where we began—the applications that I use to achieve all of this.

Graphic Design

For the moment, I find myself continually coming back to Photoshop—like a dog to its sick. I don’t really like Photoshop for design (and I loathe Illustrator) but it is familiar and thus relatively easy to dip into.

However, I am gradually weaning myself off Adobe’s products in favour of smaller, cheaper applications that are, in many ways, better for the job than Adobe’s bloated behemoth’s.

I have been playing about with Sketch (about £30) a lot, and I think it’s a wonderful application. It is very capable and, with every update (usually monthly), it becomes more capable and more stable. I am aiming to make it my primary design tool.

For non-vector based work, I have been getting into using Pixelmator (about £20) which is also an excellent (and cheap) photo-editing and design application.

Browsers

My browser of preference is Safari. Its Web Inspector tools are almost as capable as Chrome’s, and I find the browser faster and more reliable than Google’s offering.

However, I do test in all major browsers—including Internet Explorer 7, 8, 9 and 10. To achieve this on my Mac, I use VirtualBox (free) and the wonderful IEVMS script to automate the conversion of Microsoft’s supplied disk images to a format that VirtualBox can read.

Coding

A few years ago, I found myself, with a colleague, in a café with free Wi-Fi; up until that point, I had used Dreamweaver to code my work. However, my laptop was not equipped with my meatier applications and so—needing to do some coding and having read a good review of it—I downloaded Panic’s Coda.

And I have never seriously used another coding environment since (although I have also dabbled with MacRabbit’s Espresso—before they merged it with CSS Edit). I certainly never launched Dreamweaver ever again.

Coda was, essentially, my first foray into the sunlit uplands of indie Mac Developers. Up until that time, I had basically used Adobe applications and little else; for someone with this experience, the speed with which Coda launched and operated, as well as its feeling of lightness, were a revelation.

That independent developers are challenging Adobe in its core areas of photo-editing and vector design (this latter being an area that Adobe basically stole when it killed my beloved Freehand) is one of the very best things about the Mac platform right now.

I write in LESS and use the excellent CodeKit to process it, as well as for compressing images, and other useful things. Be sure to read CodeKit’s amusing release notes, by the way…

Finally, I started using CodePen a lot for experiments, reduced test cases, reference files, etc. I particularly like the fact that it compiles LESS on the fly. I haven’t had much time to continue playing with it recently, but that should change in the next few days.

Software Design

My role in this area is, essentially, to gather customer needs, to productise them, and write requirements specifications.

For this I use Apple’s Pages (£14) for the text and, for the workflows, Celestial Teapot’s very nice little diagramming application called, simply, Shapes (roughly £3!).

This latter app is—like most Mac indie apps—under active development and Celestial Teapot seem very good at taking feedback and incorporating it into releases.

Administration

For most other administrative tasks, I use Pages, Numbers and—for presentations and speaking engagements—Keynote.

When presenting, I use Apple’s Keynote Remote—running on my iPhone—to control the slides and display presenter notes (where necessary). In the absence of Wi-Fi (a rare thing these days) I carry a standard, hardware Apple Remote.

Miscellaneous

I do dabble with a few other apps, and I like to try out new applications quite often.

Wireframes

Where necessary, I use MockingBird for building up wireframes; it is simple, elegant and easy-to-use. The lack of development on it over the last couple of years has been disappointing, but it is still an excellent online application.

Animation

One app which has a great deal of potential is Tumult’s Hype. Using this application, you can build up complex animations using a timeline model, and Hype will then generate a file containing CSS3 animations (including complex matrices): even better, it will also generate the Javascript required to cater for older browsers.

Combine this with Modernizr and the built-in YepNopeJS, and you have a modern, compliant solution for creating complex animations.

Project Planning

Since I have taken over my current job role I don’t use OmniPlan as much, but I still find it useful for internal scheduling: it’s a fully-fledged project management application, with proper concepts of utilisation and efficiency.

Font Management

For font management, I still use the free version of Linotype FontExplorer X (which, whilst difficult to find now, has lasted me for years and years!), but I am starting to switch over to Bohemian Coding’s Font Case.

For web fonts, I use TypeKit (although, since Adobe has taken over, I am finding some issues with reliability. What a surprise) and, occasionally, Google Web Fonts.

And that’s about it. There are one or two applications that I play with, but the major ones are those listed above.

Do you have any favourite applications? Feel free to leave your preferences in the comments…

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